Reds, Bailey agree to six-year, $105M contract

 

Homer Bailey is reportedly set to be a Red for a long time. (USATSI)
Homer Bailey is reportedly set to be a Red for a very long time. (USATSI)

 

The Reds and right-hander Homer Bailey have agreed to a six-year contract extension worth a assured $105 million, CBSSports.com's Jon Heyman has confirmed. MLB.com's Mark Sheldon originally reported that the deal was accomplished, and Sheldon adds that the deal additionally features a mutual $25-million choice/$5-million buyout for a seventh yr. Earlier on Wednesday, Heyman reported that either side have been working toward just such a deal.

 

 

In essence, the extension would purchase out the final yr of Bailey's arbitration eligibility and the first five years of his free company, at a minimum. If the option is excercised then Bailey, at present 27, would not be a free agent till age 34.

Bailey owns two career no-hitters and final season pitched to a 3.forty nine PERIOD (110 ERA+) with a three.69 Okay/BB ratio in 209 innings of labor. These numbers are fairly much like the ones he put up in 2012, when he led the NL in begins. For his profession, Bailey owns an PERIOD+ of 96 throughout parts of seven major-league seasons.

The Reds initially drafted Bailey with the seventh-total choose in 2004.

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Friday Probables: Those Medlen kids

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A powerful ending kick (USAT)

A pretty good card, all issues thought of. But bear in mind the golden rule of September baseball: take into account every thing tentative.

We’re at 29 starters for now as a result of Andy Pettitte is being pushed back a day. As we go to post, it is not clear who the Yankees will use in his place.

I am going to record some Saturday concerns on the bottom of this blog. And again, by all means, scour all you possibly can to see the late adjustments and adjustments – groups do a lot of bizarre stuff at the moment of the season.

1. Clayton Kershaw (Col): Get out the engraving, Cy Younger lock.
2. Chris Sale (KC): No luck with wins but a terrific yr.
three. Kris Medlen (Phi): One other dominating finish, like 2012.
four. Bartolo Colon (@Sea): Bankable all 12 months and you like the task.
5. Cliff Lee (@Atl): had a hiccup in July however otherwise terrific.
6. Homer Bailey (Pit): It was a step-up year after all.
7. James Shields (@CWS): Did what the Royals expected him to do.
eight. Felix Hernandez (Oak): Hasn’t been sharpest of late however how are you going to bench him?
9. Stephen Strasburg (@Ari): Too good to bench however something all the time appears to go mistaken with him.
10. Yovani Gallardo (@NYM): Got here round eventually, but too late for a lot of.
11. Alexi Ogando (LAA): Arlington always makes me nervous.
12. Clay Buchholz (@Bal): Three good-not-nice begins since return, hasn’t gone deep in sport but.
thirteen. Rick Porcello (@Mia): Strikeout spike is encouraging.
14. Travis Wooden (@StL): Give this man a Wiggy.
15. Corey Kluber (@Min): Hard to say how healthy he is, however you just like the draw.
sixteen. Burch Smith (@SF): Strikeouts catch your eye and big park helps.
17. Scott Feldman (Bos): Not playoff bound however was dependable in final quarter.
18. A.J. Burnett (@Cin): About as consistent as a paper cup in a hurricane.
19. Brett Oberholtzer (NYY): Pitch-to-contact story, although he’s been wonderful.
20. Carlos Torres (Mil): Can miss bats, in the fitting league.
21. Lance Lynn (ChC): Looked tired down the stretch.
22. Patrick Corbin (Was): Exhausting to belief after a rocky stretch.
23. R.A. Dickey (TB): With the knuckler, nobody is aware of.
24. C.J. Wilson (@Tex): High-variance arm and within the fallacious park.
25. Jeremy Hellickson (@Tor): Even when this had been in Tampa, I might move.
26. Tom Koehler (Det): It’s worthwhile to wait for higher spots.
27. Ryan Vogelsong (SD): Beloved the comeback story but it expired in 2013.
28. Pedro Hernandez (Cle): Await the weekend, gamers.
29. Collin McHugh (@LAD): A poor remoted choice and even worse against Kershaw.

Issues for Saturday : Charlie Morton, Bronson Arroyo, Scott Kazmir, Yusmeiro Petit, Jimmy Nelson, Joe Kelly, Andy Pettitte (moved back a day), Brandon McCarthy, Yordano Ventura, Nathan Eovaldi (sadly, against Detroit).

 

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Cardinals rookie Michael Wacha loses no-hitter with two outs in ninth on agonizing infield single

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No, no, no! Instead of turning into the third pitcher in Major League Baseball to throw a no-hitter in 2013, rookie right-hander Michael Wacha of the St. Louis Cardinals became the third to lose a no-no with two outs within the ninth inning Tuesday night.

Wacha stands 6-foot-6. If solely he have been two inches taller, he may have fielded the chopper that Washington’s Ryan Zimmerman hit over the mound, just out of his attain. As an alternative, after shortstop Pete Kozma made a barehanded grab, his throw pulled first baseman Matt Adams off the bag. Zimmerman ran by Adams’ outstretched arm and evaded his mitt. Umpire Jeff Kellogg, failing to channel Jim Joyce and give us no-hitter vigilante justice, accurately signaled secure. The official scorer, also rightly, ruled it a hit.

Displaying maturity beyond his 22 years, Wacha took it in stride.

“I think it nicked off my glove a bit bit,” Wacha told reporters afterward. “Kozma made an awesome effort on it. You can’t hate on Pete, or something. I assume I just wasn’t meant to throw one tonight.”

The identical may very well be stated earlier this season for Yu Darvish of the Rangers and Yusmeiro Petit of the Giants, each of whom also came within one out of historical past, solely to lose their respective bids with one out to go. Three such close calls in the identical season hasn’t happened since 1990. It is the 52nd time, all time, that a pitcher has lost a no-hitter with two outs in the ninth.

Wacha just missed becoming a member of Homer Bailey of the Reds (on July 2) and Tim Lincecum of the Giants (on July 13), within the season’s no-hit membership. Bailey additionally had one in 2012. It could have been the 11th no-hitter in Cardinals historical past and the primary since Bud Smith, also a rookie on the time, no-hit the Padres in 2001. Wacha would have been the twenty second rookie general to throw no-hitter, and the first since Clay Buchholz of the Red Sox in 2007. He’ll most likely get more probabilities.

(AP)

Wacha seemed on his approach to historical past after Steve Lombardozzi grounded to short leading off the ninth and Denard Span — who was booed by the gang for trying to bunt for a hit in the sixth — struck out searching for the second out. Span also was Wacha’s ninth strikeout.

Zimmerman hit Wacha’s 112th and remaining pitch for an infield single. Playing cards supervisor Mike Matheny didn’t hesitate, pulling Wacha in favor of Trevor Rosenthal, who retired Jayson Werth for the ultimate out. By the way in which, the Cardinals won 2-0 and moved nearer to clinching the NL Central.

The one baserunner Wacha allowed through 5 innings came on a fielding error by Matt Carpenter. Wacha didn’t permit a walk till the seventh, and he put the first two batters aboard by way of base on balls within the eighth. But Wilson Ramos followed by hitting right into a 6-four-3 double play and Anthony Rendon flied out to left — although outfielder Kerry Robinson needed to run a great distance into the nook to make the catch:

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Jonathan Papelbon says Yasiel Puig making the All-Star Game would be an ‘injustice’ and a ‘joke’

(Getty Images) The ever-outspoken Jonathan Papelbon has some thoughts about rookie Yasiel Puig potentially being an All-Star. Specifically, the Philadelphia Phillies closer thinks that would be “a joke” and an “injustice” to veteran players.

Puig — who had a 3-for-5 night with a homer on Tuesday for the Los Angeles Dodgers — is hitting443/.473/.745 after taking baseball by storm on June 3. He’s played in only 27 games and been to the plate 112 times, but he’s made all those opportunities count. His 44 debut-month hits are second historically to only Joe DiMaggio who had 48 in May 1936. In addition, Puig has hit eight homers, knocked in 17 runs and the Dodgers are 16-11 since his debut.

All this has begged the question: Should Puig be an All-Star? Papelbon, fearless closer that he is, took that issue head on during an interview with MLB Network Radio:

“The guy’s got a month, I don’t even think he’s got a month in the big leagues, and just comparing him to this and that, and saying he’s going to make the all-star team, that’s a joke to me. It’s just really what happens in baseball when… to me it really does an injustice to the veteran players that have been in the game for eight, nine, ten plus years, and it kind of does them an injustice because they’ve worked so hard to stay there.”

Here’s the interview clip in question. Pay close attention to when Papelbon says “Pig, Puig, whatever.”

Puig isn’t even on the All-Star ballot, but he’s been getting write-in support from fans. Realistically, his best chance at getting on the team is through MLB’s Final Vote, which crowns the 34th player on each team through a separate fan vote. That comes after players and the All-Star managers have their say. Rosters will be announced Saturday.

NL All-Star manager Bruce Bochy had previously said he didn’t think Puig’s short time in MLB was enough to warrant a selection. Of course, Puig’s non-stop hit barrage could have changed that. There have only been four games in which Puig didn’t get a hit. Further: In 15 of his 27 games, he’s gotten more than one hit.

It’s worth noting that Papelbon was elected to the All-Star game in his rookie season. The circumstances were a tad different. He got his big-league call-up in the previous season and played a little bit then. In 2006, though, he had 0.59 ERA and 26 saves, pitching 46 innings in 40 games before being named to the All-Star team.

He was one of three rookies who made the team that year. At the time, he said:

“It’s been a wild, wild ride. It’s awesome. It was a very emotional experience to find out that I had made the team. We’re the next crop coming in. This is exciting because it is the starting points of our career.”

At the heart of the Puig All-Star debate is a theme that’s at the core of many debates: ruffling tradition.

(Getty Images) Traditionalists think Puig simply hasn’t shown enough to be considered an All-Star, and that the All-Star Game is an important institution that not just anybody who has played 27 games can sprint into. The other side of the argument says Puig should be an All-Star because he’s the most exciting player in baseball right now, the kind of guy people will turn on their TVs to watch, even if they’re not huge baseball fans. He’s a boost for the game, much as he’s been a boost for the Dodgers.

Here’s one thing to ponder: Justin Upton of the Atlanta Braves would be, at last tally, a starting outfielder in the National League. He’s hit 15 home runs. Not too shabby. However, he hit 12 of those home runs during a hot first month of the season. Since May 1, he’s hit a pretty disappointing229/.342/.323 with only three homers.

You gotta wonder how many people are upset Justin Upton is likely going to be an All-Star this season because of one good month.

 

 

Homer Bailey is latest to join the elite club of pitchers with multiple no-hitters

Homer Bailey became the 31st pitcher in baseball history to throw multiple no-hitters by stifling the bats of the San Francisco Giants on Tuesday night. It's an elite group of pitchers that includes some bona fide legends (Nolan Ryan, Sandy Koufax, Cy Young, Christy Mathewson), some current stars (Justin Verlander and Roy Halladay) and a few guys that date all the way back to the late 1800s.

HOMER BAILEY
July 2, 2013: Cincinnati vs. San Francisco
Sept. 28, 2012: Cincinnati at Pittsburgh

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Who will be next to join this group? Well, current pitchers who already have a no-hitter include Felix Hernandez, Matt Cain, Clay Buchholz, Anibal Sanchez, A.J. Burnett, Matt Garza, Francisco Liriano, Jered Weaver and a handful of others.

King Felix seems like the obvious favorite, but if we were asking this question before Tuesday, not a lot of people would have picked Bailey. That's the great thing about no-hitters. We never know which pitcher could surprise us.